Lamashtu

In Mesopotamian mythology, Lamashtu (Akkadian dLa-maš-tu) was a female demon, monster, malevolent goddess or demigoddess who menaced women during childbirth and, if possible, kidnapped their children while they were breastfeeding. She would gnaw on their bones and suck their blood, as well as being charged with a number of other evil deeds. She was a daughter of the Sky God Anu. Lamashtu is depicted as … Continue reading Lamashtu

Hanbi

In Sumerian and Akkadian mythology (and Mesopotamian mythology in general) Hanbi or Hanpa (more commonly known in western text) was the god of evil, god of all evil forces and the father of Pazuzu and Humbaba. Aside from his relationship with Pazuzu, very little is known of this figure. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanbi Moderately mockable name (although certainly less so than Humbaba), the opportunity here is for a … Continue reading Hanbi

Humbaba the Terrible

The iconography of the apotropaic severed head of Humbaba, with staring eyes, flowing beard and wild hair, is well documented from the First Babylonian dynasty, continuing into Neo-Assyrian art and dying away during the Achaemenid rule. The severed head of the monstrous Humbaba found a Greek parallel in the myth of Perseus[10] and the similarly employed head of Medusa, which Perseus placed in his leather sack.[11] Archaic Greek depictions of the gorgoneion render it bearded, an anomaly in … Continue reading Humbaba the Terrible