The Kingdom of Dyfed

The Kingdom of Dyfed (Welsh pronunciation: [‘dəvɛd]) is one of several Welsh petty kingdoms that emerged in 5th-century sub-Roman Britain in southwest Wales based on the former territory of the Demetae (modern Welsh Dyfed). In the year 360, a sudden series of coordinated raids by the Irish, Anglo-Saxons and Picts began.[citation needed] These continued as the Irish colonised the Isle of Man (formerly Brittonic-speaking like … Continue reading The Kingdom of Dyfed

The Kingdom of Gwynedd

Welsh tradition credited the founding of Gwynedd to the Brittonic polity of Gododdin (Old Welsh Guotodin, earlier Brittonic form Votadini) from Lothian invading the lands of the Brittonic polities of the Deceangli, Ordovices, and Gangani in the 5th century. The sons of their leader, Cunedda, were said to have possessed the land between the rivers Dee and Teifi. The true borders of the realm varied … Continue reading The Kingdom of Gwynedd

Language and Literacy

The common tongue is also known as Parsik, the language of the Sasanian dynasty of the Holy Empire, and is “common” to the far flung extents of the Holy Empire and its trading partners before it fell.
The Fair Folk of Albion (generally recognized as the Elves, Half-Elven, Halfling and Western Dwarf peoples) share a language, with regional variations, known as Gaelic. The human and near-human tribes native to the Isle of Man speak a derivation of the language known as Manx. This was formally supplanted by the common tongue as the far western borders of the Holy Empire encompassed Albion, although there are still isolated pockets of its use. Continue reading Language and Literacy

Prologue

It’s been a generation since the Eastern Empire and their Sun-King has fallen, and the light of civilization with it. In the West, the kingdom of Lethowsow was one of the seven fabled realms of the Fair Folk before the arrival of savage humans centuries ago. Now, the dwarves have abandoned their hidden underground strongholds, the elves have retreated to the deep woods, and the … Continue reading Prologue